Certificate or Citizenship


Shorstein, Lasnetski, & Gihon
helps citizens obtain their
Certificate of Citizenship

Some people are United States citizens as a matter of law.  For example, if you had a greencard as a child and a parent naturalized, you may have become a United States citizen as a matter of law.  If you were born outside the United States to a United States citizen parent, you may be a United States Citizen.  But how do you prove it?  You can obtain evidence of your United States citizenship by obtaining a United States passport.  But passports expire.  You can rarely use an expired United States passport as proof of citizenship.  A Certificate of Citizenship does not expire.  If you believe that you are a United States citizen, but don't have proof, you may want to obtain a Certificate of Citizenship, after consulting with an immigration attorney.

What is a Certificate of Citizenship?

A Certificate of Citizenship is much like a United States birth certificate.  It is a certificate issued by USCIS (United States Citizenship and Immigration Services), which is the government agency that issues immigration benefits within the United States.  The Certificate of Citizenship is evidence of U.S. citizenship.  Therefore, you should be able to use it to enter the United States, obtain employment, obtain a driver's license, and otherwise establish your United States citizenship.  
How do I obtain a Certificate of Citizenship?

To obtain a Certificate of Citizenship, you would file an N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship, along with evidence that you are a United States citizen.  The evidence you must submit depends on you situation.  


If my Application for a Certificate of Citizenship is denied, can I file a new Application?

No.  The N-600 is one of the few forms that you can only file once.  If it is denied, you cannot file a new N-600.  That is why it is really important to file the N-600, Application for Certificate of Citizenship correctly with the correct evidence the first time.  However, if your N-has 600 was denied, there still may be options available. Contact an experienced immigration lawyer to discuss your particular facts. 

What if I have always been considered a United States citizen, but now, I'm not sure?

We have represented clients who have spent their entire lives believing and being treated as United States citizens.  However, they later discover that they are not U.S. citizens, or they are now not so sure.  Regardless of whether you believed that you were a United States citizen, there can be serious consequences for claiming to be a U.s. citizen or voting in a U.S. election.  If you believe that you are or maybe a United States citizen but do not have a Certificate of Citizenship, you should consult with an immigration lawyer to get their professional opinion. 

If you think you may be a U.S. citizen,
Call 
Shorstein, Lasnetski, & Gihon

We can help you with your
Application for Certificate of Citizenship.

904-642-3332 (Jacksonville)
407-228-2019 (Orlando)

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